April 6, 2014

Drugged Up Jihadist Terrorists In Syria Are Setting Up The "Large Scale Production" of CW Gases For Future Use

Syria is being overrun by tens of thousands of drugged up, sociopathic Jokers who believe blowing up entire communities is fun and laugh at their crimes and the carnage they leave behind. And they're being backed by Washington, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, France, England, Israel, Qatar, Pakistan, and a few other countries.

An excerpt from, "Captagon is jihadists’ main weapon" Voltaire Network, April 2, 2014:
While the Western and Gulf media lead people to believe that jihadists get their nourishment primarily from the verses of the Koran, the seizures made in Syria show that in reality, they feed on Captagon.

In two days, the Syrian Arab Army took hold of a car full of Captagon tablets and a tank truck containing a ton.

Captagon (Fenetylline hydrochloride) is an amphetamine that causes euphoria and numbs the pain. Mixed with other drugs like hashish, it constitutes the basic feed ration for the jihadists. Combatants neither feel their own suffering nor the suffering they inflict on others. Therefore, they can commit all sorts of atrocities, laughing.
Fenethylline is a popular drug, allegedly used by anti-government forces, in the Syrian Civil War. It is manufactured locally in a cheap and simple process. According to Khabib Ammar, a local media activist, anti-government groups would also export the drug in exchange for weapons.
An excerpt from, "Syria's civil war being fought with fighters high on drugs" by Colin Freeman, The Telegraph, January 12, 2014:
The conflict has turned it into a major consumer and exporter of the drugs, which are said to generate hundreds of millions of dollars in profits each year.
The main stimulant in question is Captagon, the former brand name of a drug first used as an antidepressant in the West in the 1960s, but now banned in most countries because of its addictive properties. 
According an investigation by the Reuters news agency, Syrian government forces and rebel groups both accuse each other of using Captagon to fight prolonged battles without sleep. The pills, which many ordinary Syrians are also increasingly turning to, sell for between £3 and £15.
Captagon is often made by amateur chemists in makeshift lab.

Production is both cheap and simple, requiring "only basic knowledge of chemistry and a few scales", according to Ramzi Haddad, a Lebanese psychiatrist.

"It gives you a kind of euphoria," he said. "You're talkative, you don't sleep, you don't eat, you're energetic." 

A drug control officer in the central city of Homs said he had observed the effects of Captagon on protesters and fighters held for questioning.

"We would beat them, and they wouldn't feel the pain," he said. "Many of them would laugh while we were dealing them heavy blows."
An excerpt from, "The Red Line and the Rat Line: Seymour M. Hersh on Obama, Erdoğan and the Syrian rebels" London Review of Books, April 6, 2014:
For months there had been acute concern among senior military leaders and the intelligence community about the role in the war of Syria’s neighbours, especially Turkey. Prime Minister Recep Erdoğan was known to be supporting the al-Nusra Front, a jihadist faction among the rebel opposition, as well as other Islamist rebel groups. ‘We knew there were some in the Turkish government,’ a former senior US intelligence official, who has access to current intelligence, told me, ‘who believed they could get Assad’s nuts in a vice by dabbling with a sarin attack inside Syria – and forcing Obama to make good on his red line threat.’

The joint chiefs also knew that the Obama administration’s public claims that only the Syrian army had access to sarin were wrong. The American and British intelligence communities had been aware since the spring of 2013 that some rebel units in Syria were developing chemical weapons. On 20 June analysts for the US Defense Intelligence Agency issued a highly classified five-page ‘talking points’ briefing for the DIA’s deputy director, David Shedd, which stated that al-Nusra maintained a sarin production cell: its programme, the paper said, was ‘the most advanced sarin plot since al-Qaida’s pre-9/11 effort’. (According to a Defense Department consultant, US intelligence has long known that al-Qaida experimented with chemical weapons, and has a video of one of its gas experiments with dogs.) The DIA paper went on: ‘Previous IC [intelligence community] focus had been almost entirely on Syrian CW [chemical weapons] stockpiles; now we see ANF attempting to make its own CW … Al-Nusrah Front’s relative freedom of operation within Syria leads us to assess the group’s CW aspirations will be difficult to disrupt in the future.’ The paper drew on classified intelligence from numerous agencies: ‘Turkey and Saudi-based chemical facilitators,’ it said, ‘were attempting to obtain sarin precursors in bulk, tens of kilograms, likely for the anticipated large scale production effort in Syria.’ (Asked about the DIA paper, a spokesperson for the director of national intelligence said: ‘No such paper was ever requested or produced by intelligence community analysts.’)

Last May, more than ten members of the al-Nusra Front were arrested in southern Turkey with what local police told the press were two kilograms of sarin. In a 130-page indictment the group was accused of attempting to purchase fuses, piping for the construction of mortars, and chemical precursors for sarin. Five of those arrested were freed after a brief detention. The others, including the ringleader, Haytham Qassab, for whom the prosecutor requested a prison sentence of 25 years, were released pending trial. In the meantime the Turkish press has been rife with speculation that the Erdoğan administration has been covering up the extent of its involvement with the rebels. In a news conference last summer, Aydin Sezgin, Turkey’s ambassador to Moscow, dismissed the arrests and claimed to reporters that the recovered ‘sarin’ was merely ‘anti-freeze’.